Two Kinds of Faith

John 14 b.png    Philip said, “Lord, show us the Father, and that will be enough for us,” Jesus answered: “Don’t you know me, Philip, even after I have been among you such a long time? Anyone who has seen me has seen the Father. How can you say, “Show us the Father?’ Don’t you believe that I am in the Father, and that the Father is in me? The words I say to you I do not speak on my own authority, Rather, it is the Father, living in me, who is doing his work. Believe me when I say that I am in the Father and the Father is in me, or at least believe on the evidence of the works themselves.   John 14:9-11

People travel different road to find faith in God. Some have a dramatic experience with Him and never doubt Him again. Others struggles with conflicting and perplexing ideas that they finally resolve. There are those that live a promiscuous, and ungodly life, only when they are on the verge of despair, do they seek a better road and find it in Christ.

Jesus here speaks of two ways in which we can come to faith in Him: to see Him as He is or to get to know Him in all his fullness. In the first way, the person takes Jesus at his word, form, and responds in love and surrenders. It can be called “intuitive faith,” where people meet Christ in a deeply religious experience that fills their whole life with meaning, purpose and direction.

In the second way, the person reasons things out. On this road to faith, the person says, “I see the world and it looks wonderful. It must have a Creator. I read about this remarkable man who healed the sick and died a brutal death on a cross. He must have loved us very much. I see the impact he has on many lives where he reveals miraculous grace. I will now walk this word myself.” Whichever route you choose to faith, just make sure that you know Jesus Christ as your Friend; that you worship Him and serve Him as your Lord and Savior.

Grace and Peace to You My Friends 

Growing Closer to Jesus This Season!

The Season of Lent.png

Lent is a time for self-reflection and deepening one’s relationship with God in Jesus Christ. For many this season leading up to Easter will be weeks of giving up something they enjoy as a sign of contrition for mistakes they have made. Others will spend extra time in devotions and prayer, while a few more will carry a cross or nail in their pocket as a reminder of the sacrifice Jesus made for them and the whole world.

If those practices work for you, wonderful! Others may want to find different ways of observing this holy season. Consider adopting one or more of the following creative uses of the days between Ash Wednesday and Easter Sunday.

  1. Pray for others you see as you walk to and from throughout your day
  2. Volunteer one hour or more each week with a local shelter, tutoring program, nursing home, prison ministry.
  3. Participate in a Lent-a-Day-practice and pray each day with your camera in your hand. start praying
  4. Cultivate a life of gratitude. Write someone a thank you letter each week and be aware of how many people have helped you along life’s journey.
  5. Create a daily quiet time. (this is something I do, I drive my youngest back and forth to school, and when I pick her up I am at her school an hour to spend time alone with God. Read a daily devotional for the season of lent.
  6. Give up soft drinks, fast food, tea, or coffee. Give the money you save to help local folks or those in a different part of the world who are in crisis.
  7. Forgive someone who doesn’t deserve it ( maybe even yourself)
  8. Go deeper into your study in the Bible, be a part of a study group, and meditate on the words “I Am” sayings of Jesus in the Gospel of John
  9. Start a prayer rhythm. Each day of Lent, pray for another person.
  10. Tray and electronic fast, give up tv, face book, tweeting, e-mail and all things electronic for one day each week.

 

Grace and Peace to You My Friends

Ash Wednesday

untitled5465.pngThe season of lent will begin on Ash Wednesday March 1, 2017 and will end on Saturday April 16,2017. Ash Wednesday is an important day to us as Christians, many of us will attend some kind of service. It is in many ways a somber day, many pastors will smudge ashes on our forehead at some point of the service in a sign of the cross. These ashes that a pastor uses are the psalms from last year Psalm Sunday. They remind us of our mortality and calls us to repentance-seeking God’s forgiveness for our sin, both the things we have and also for the ones we have not done yet.

During these forty days of lent we can take a hard look at our own lives, as we draw closer to God, and his desire for our own lives. God has a plan for your life as well as my own and that no one but you or I can do. We can do different things such as forgive someone who has wrong you in someway, and believe me that is one that is so hard for any human to do. You may need to ask someone for their forgiveness if you have wrong them in anyway, and more important you need to forgive yourself of any sin that you seem to hold on to. Jesus already died on the cross for all our sins and he has forgiven you, now you must forgive yourself. Take time out to pray, pray thru out your day, pray is our conversation that we have with God everyday. Some people fast, at times a meal, some may do an entire day what ever is best for you and always check with your doctor before you begin to do any fasting. Find a way during this season to serve, in a church, your community, the possibility are endless for all. One thing that we can do is BE STILL AND KNOW THAT I AM GOD  (Psalm 46:10) it is when we are quiet that we can hear what God needs to share with us, and hear his calling on own life.

Psalm 51:1-2 (NIV)

Have mercy on me, O God, according to your unfailing love; according to your great compassion blot out my transgressions. Wash away all my iniquity and cleanse me from sin.

 

Grace and Peace to you my friends