My Father’s Name (Guess Blogger)

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Today, we are looking and I might add with reverence and awe, some of the many names of God. He starts off in Genesis as Elohim, to show His strength and moves to Yahweh, Jehovah, and Adonai. He also uses El as an abbreviation. You may notice the plural of Elohim, the Trinity. Many words are added in the Old Testament to portray His forgiveness, closeness, strength and holiness. Elohay Yishi is the God of my salvation. He is definitely the I AM to Moses, and though some dispute the correct pronunciation, Jehovah or Yahweh, are the most common for YHVH, He ends up again as Father, Abba, as Jesus is seated with Him in Revelation.

He revealed His personality through His name, just like we do. Most people know me as Rebecca, but to others, it’s always Becky, yet, I am a writer, daughter, friend. You get the idea. we are said to wear many hats in the figurative, so do we have many names or titles, and while some may not think that we ever lose ourselves or our way, we definitely need to know who we are in Christ, who the father mad us to be.

God, to me, anyway, rolled all His names up into one, Jesus. He sent Him to redeem a fallen creation, He was one with Jesus, and He was the embodiment of God’s love. Jesus also has a lot of names, they both are the Great I Am, and the Alpha and Omega in Greek, and the Alef Tav in Hebrew. The letter tav in an older version looks like a cross. His name is above all of them and He has all authority.

So God is,

El Roi, the God who sees.

Jehovah Shammah, the God who is here.

Jehovah Rapha, the God who heals.

Jehovah Jireh, the provider.

Jehovah Nissi, our banner or victory, is love love over us.

El Gibor, a mighty God.

El Elyon, the Lord Most High.

El Shaddai, the many breasted one, nurturing and loving.

Jehovah Shaloam, God is our peace.

El Qanna, the jealous God. His jealousy isn’t like ours, sinful, He is just wanting the best for us and to spend time with us.

I could give you so many more, but please enjoy the video. And there are many lists if you care to study further. Rebecca Jones / pexels

Thank you Rebecca for your blog it is a pleasure to read them

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Abba Dance The Day You Were Born (Guess Blogger)

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Have you heard that expression that angels or God danced the day you were born? Well, He did, and so did angels. ( melakh / messenger ) Abba was certainly proud of His creation. Abba is Hebrew for Father and Jesus died so we could know His, He called Him God, when He normally said Father, from the from the cross, He gave us a Father.
Abba is spelled with the alef and bet in Hebrew and the symbols are for strength and a house. While God intended for men to be the strong and loving head of the house, it is He who should actually be the head of the house. Joshua says that he and his house will serve the Lord.

But what about dancing? We know angels rejoice over the salvation of a sinner but Zephaniah 3:17 says that He rejoices over us with singing and quiets us with His love. Now is He singing without dancing? I think not. Oh, I’m sure He could kick up His heels if He wanted to, but I think He is a slow dancer. You can stand on His shoes and dance with Him like you would an earthly father. Shoes often represent peace in the Christian dream interpretations. Remember, the beautiful ones that carry the gospel is peace.
How peaceful to see a couple glide effortlessly across the dance floor, or the ballet. There are many expressions for dance in the Hebrew language, and at the end of the post I will leave you a few and you can think how He might have danced on your birthday, at your wedding or how He will someday in the future.

I wanted to teach a little Hebrew, as I have enjoyed it for years. I know a little, but unless it’s in a prayer language, I neither read or write it. And I didn’t want to overload it like a college course, just to give you a sense of the beauty of Christ, hidden in the depths of His Word, and they were written in Hebrew and Greek. I know of a church who says they study no Greek, and I imagine no Hebrew, but what a shame to miss out on something. When that something might have deeper revelation of Abba, something lost in translation.
I think it is a beautiful thing to be held in a loving Father’s arms as you attempt to follow in the steps of Christ. How graceful and peaceful is His love, and what a blessing to know He sings over us, perhaps even daily, morning and night, to both wake us and quiet us, and how wonderful to know He wipes away our tears and will one day wipe them forever, you can be sure as a sinner, saved by grace there was rejoicing, and be just as confident that Abba danced the day your were born. Rebecca Jones / pexels

Hebrew words for dance.
chal – to dance in a ring or circle, twirl or whirl, also machol, or machtot.
rakad – to skip or leap, like ballet.
kirker – to spin around,showing great emotion. Pour out your soul.
pizez – to leap, where we get pizzazz.
berach – to kneel. also bless/
gil – to spin around in joy, to rejoice.
Ya Gil – God dancing.

Thank you so much Rebecca for sharing your post here at quietmomentswithgod, you can also follow at adaughtergiftoflove.wordpress.com

The Science of Shhh! (Guess Blogger)

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I was thinking I had read something about saying Shhh! in Hebrew that had spiritual implications, almost like the shofar and driving off the enemy. As of writing this, I have been unable to find it, and for that I apologize.

Shhh! It is a very common way of asking people to be quiet, usually, with finger to the lips, it is a common and worldwide term, understood by most people. While the word,  “chasaah “, is Hebrew for silent, the word, “sheket “, is usually, hush.  “Sheket, yeled. “, is a way parents may tell their children to politely or not so politely, to shut up.

I think the Lord, though He gets angry, and is firm, thankfully, it only lasts a moment, has a soft touch about Him, the calm, stillness, rest, being undisturbed. His ” Sheket, yeled, “, is more of a hush child. Shhh is said to be a variation from the Middle Ages, of hush. There are lullabies with the world hush. Shhh is definitely a word for children and babies. But aren’t we His children? Sometimes, we just need the rest and quiet that draws His peace.

The ” Be still and know, I am God. ” of Psalm 46:10, has the implication of silence, the literal meaning is to sink low. It is like a bending, kneeling, a deliberate letting go of cares, there is healing in this verse as well. Can you really be that still, sure you can.

While Old Testament word, ” charash ” with the k sound means to plow or engrave, as the stripes on His back or being engraved on His palms or wrists, it also is used for deaf, and silent. Jesus was in the lonely places, the quiet or silent, place. He prayed quietly, and did not listen to the mocking or accusation, and did not address all of them, He knew what the Father told Him.

While Psalm 22:2 speaks of not rest, others like Psalm 39:2 and 61:1 use the feminine word , ” dumiyah “, a waiting or repose, the words, help my peace, indicates quiet and still.

Whether or not shhh runs off the devil or not, the rest, the quiet and peace that Jesus offers us does give us the calm, the peace, that  brings us strength and victory. The shaloam or shabbat shaloam, we all need. Also, the word pictures for the letter sheen in Hebrew. like our sh, is teeth or flames of fire.  Maybe, it is the quiet, that kind of shhh, that breaks the devils teeth or sends him to the lake of fire. We could all use a little hushing, and then shhh is nice for a while everyday. That may be the science of shhh, after all. Rebecca Jones / public domain

  • It occurred to me that I heard of a woman, a Pentecostal, I think, who used a certain term in prayer, it may have been a prayer language.  That may be what I am remembering, the exact phrase, I could not say, but the shhh sound was in it. And it made reference to the wicked one, we all need to run him off.

 

Thank you Rebecca, here a little information about Rebecca, I’m a writer, Christian, I love music and art. I am hoping to encourage women to follow their dreams and trust Jesus. I am always working on improving my blog, keeping with the theme of teaching women to rest and be the beloved, may multiply our grace, all for His glory.

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Consider The Source (Guess Blogger)

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Hello everyone today I would like to introduce to you Carole Anne:
Carole Anne Hallyburton began His Own Heart Ministries as a weekly devotional blog during her days as a graduate student of Christian Education at Gordon Conwell Theological Seminary – Charlotte, where she also served as student body president for two years. In addition to her master’s degree from GCTS, Carole Anne holds a bachelor’s degree from UNC-Chapel Hill. She teaches ancient Hebrew language, reviews books for B&H Publishing Group, Paraclete Press and Crossway USA. She additionally serves on the Board of Advisors for Bible Journey, LLC, a producer of online curricula for churches, small groups and individuals.

Sometimes it cuts like a knife and breaks a person’s heart.

It tops the proverbial list as one of the most all-at-once difficult things to do.

But then again – at times – it’s the only scriptural thing to do: choosing to respond with grace to a less-than-graceful situation. Consider the source, as my maternal grandmother often said. And let it go. Walk away.

Did you know, in fact, that Jesus Christ set just such an example for us on several New Testament occasions? One in particular involved the fateful decision of the rich young ruler who approached Him in search of eternal life (see Matthew 19:16-30). While Scripture doesn’t record that He did so, I can almost see our Savior concluding the conversation with something like, I’m so sorry you like this, but go your way in peace.

And of course His tantamount demonstration of the principle is seen in His response to those heinous accusers who mucked, taunted, humiliated, abused the Savior in His darkest hour as He hung on the cross. With thorns piercing His head, nails driven heartlessly through His hands and feet – and shouldering a world of false accusations, lest we forget – He asked that God the Father forgive [those accusers], for they know not what they do (Luke 23-24).

Never, ever in my humanity will I begin to possess even the purity that resides in the tip of one of the fingers on those beautiful, nail-scarred hand of Jesus, but the rich young ruler, the cross and several other scenes from Scripture rolled like a film through my mind late last fall. Numbly I turned from the grave of my beloved paternal grandparents. Just two weeks earlier, I had been excited while out with friends to find the ornamental vase on the military headstone empty – I’d waited patiently for several years to place flowers there. Since no one has a legitimate claim on the vase or the stone (Granddaddy earned them himself for his service to America in Tokyo Bay, Japan, during World War II), I went straight from the cemetery, purchased two sprawling, gorgeous bunches of artificial sunflowers and placed them. I wish you could have seen them.

But barely a week passed and my spirit went numb when – again with friends – I found this new bouquet replaced by a mini-poinsettia arrangement. The numbness later gave way to what felt like a knife twisting deeply into my stomach when, ironically, I learned that there was footage of the sunflowers being removed and replaced with the new arrangement. Although what I saw on the footage merely confirmed what I had to that point suspected, it was difficult to fathom there in black and white. Suspicion is simply suspicion until one is faced with undeniable fact; and when a fact what I saw emerges, it devastates.

Been there yourself? No fun, is it? I’ve learned over the years that a spiritually intimate communication system with Jesus can and will go a long way in carrying God’s child through the mire of devastation, betrayal and heartbreak when dreaded suspicion turns to cold hard truth. So take heart: there is a workaround.

But it demands that God’s child make the difficult-yet-deliberate choice to step back from human emotions, grit her teeth, hit her knees and ask Christ to lead the way. It’s a challenge that grows easier for the Christ-follower who has fallen in love with Jesus as opposed to simply loving Jesus out of some obligation. That’s a whole different blog post, though.

By His grace and to His glory, He enabled me to hedge my feelings about the flowers and the frustration and ask for grace to process them all in His way for His purpose. Within the hour, He brought the Aaronic Blessing to mind (Numbers 6:24-26). Also called the Aaronic Benediction, it contains the words used by Aaron and other priests as a sending-forth of Old Testament Israelites from worship services in the tabernacle and is still used to dismiss many of our church services today. Yesterday, however, it was the ancient Hebrew rendering of the passage – in other words, what it meant to its original audience instead of America’s perception of it today – that God had me to apply in response to the situation at hand.

The English rendering of the blessing reads thus:

The Lord bless thee, and keep thee: the Lord make His face shine upon thee, and be gracious unto thee: the Lord lift up His countenance upon thee, and give thee peace.

It’s actually a beautiful blessing but it’s also a blessing easily memorized and often recited without much thought. With that in mind, let’s look at some of the English words to get a grasp of their specific Hebrew meanings and images they involve: bless, keep, gracious, grant and peace. Note that I have italicized the transliterations following their Hebrew forms below.

– Bless
In the passage, the Hebrew verb ברך (barak) is written in its piel conjugation and means to show respect, to bless, at times to kneel. These definitions, though, carry a bit of an abstract flavor; by looking at other words related to the verb, we can find a more concrete interpretation for a more focused phrase. Such words include the nouns ברך (berek) meaning knee and ברכה (berakah) meaning a gift, a present. From this we can see that to bless in this case insinuates the bringing of a gift to another while kneeling out of respect. The extended meaning of this word is to do or to give something of value to another. So we’re actually asking God to bless a person by gifting him or her with something of value.

– Keep
A nomadic people raising livestock, it was not uncommon for Hebrew shepherds to spend nights in a field with their flocks, away from other Israelites. In order to protect his flock, the shepherd would construct a makeshift fence of thorn bushes or brambles, thereby guarding his flock and creating a literal hedge of protection around them. The Hebrew rendering of thorn is שמיר (shamiyr), which is derived from the verb שמר (shamar), literally meaning to guard, to keep, to protect. Here, then, we’re asking God to place a stalwart hedge of protection around the person of our focus.

– Gracious
While most theologians tend to define grace as unmerited favor, the idea of grace takes on a slightly less abstract meaning in the Aaronic Blessing. The Hebrew verb translated as gracious in the passage is the verb חנן (hhanan) and is often grouped with Hebrew words meaning to heal, to help, to be lifted up, to find refuge, strength and rescue. From a more concrete Hebraic perspective this verb means to provide protection beyond the aforementioned hedge. To obtain protection, a member of a flock typically looks to its shepherd. We are asking Christ – the Good Shepherd – to provide a haven of comfort and safety for the subject of our prayer.

– Grant
The Hebrew verb שים (siym), means literally to set something or someone down in a fixed and arranged place. Read on to learn the significance of this word within its phrase.

– Peace
Ah, we have arrived at the final and often most pivotal word of the passage. Our Western culture tends to associate peace simply as an absence of war or strife, but שלום (shalom) as used in this passage has quite a varied meaning. It is derived from the root שלם (shalam) and is generally used in the context of restoring or bringing restoration to one who is missing something needed in his or her life. The verb shalam literally means to make whole or complete. The noun shalom has the more literal meaning of being in a state of wholeness, or being without deficiency. So in the phrase grant you peace, we are asking God to restore the person to physical, emotional and – most importantly by far – spiritual wholeness by setting the person down in a divinely-appointed place for said restoration to happen. That’s something that only He can do.

Now – get this – while Old Testament priests spoke blessings like this one in front of the entire Israelite congregation, the verbal conjugations in the Aaronic Blessing are specifically written in singular form, not plural. In other words, and although the blessing was spoken over a group of many, its phrases were directed at each individual within that group. In the midst of a public gathering, then, the priest recognized and blessed each person in an individual, personal manner.

The irony of this individuality struck me on that autumn evening as I quietly spoke the Hebrew version of Aaronic Blessing while thinking of the poinsettia arrangement, the sunflowers Granny would’ve loved, the ones I’ll always miss.

And – most importantly – the irony struck me as I spoke the words of the passage over the party who replaced the latter arrangement with the former. The words, at their most literal level, translate to English like so:

May God kneel before you, presenting gifts and guarding you closely with a hedge of protection. May His gaze illuminate the wholeness of His being toward you, bringing needed order to your life, giving you comfort and sustenance. May He lift up His wholeness of being and look upon you with love. May He set in place all your mind, body and soul needs – everything – to be whole and complete and restored in and through Him.

It was indeed all-at-once one of the most difficult things to do and the only thing to do: consider the source, then let it go.

Before I walked away.

(A beautiful rendition of The Aaronic Benediction, performed by Joshua Aaron and Misha Goetz, is available for listening here. May it bless you.)

Copyright 2018, Carole Anne Hallyburton. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

The Struggle Of Our Today (Guess Blogger)

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“We’ll tell you about our broken places of yesterday but don’t dare admit the limitations of our today.” Lysa Terkeurst.
Wow. These words are heavy, exposing the truth. It is easier to talk about the past. How we have overcome trials demonstrating our own persistence and strength. Of course, from time to time we will include God, most times as a hero who swept in and saved the day. Rescuing us from the storm.
But talking about today? Being transparent; honest? That is a different story. It takes guts. We like to appear to the world as having it all together. As if we can accomplish this insane to do list, save the world, and be home for supper. In reality, we are falling apart- most people are facing limitations daily, which could be illness, addiction, family disputes, or finances.

With a chronic illness, we act often. Taking on the role of a healthy and normal individual in order to blend in or make others happy. A friend asks how we are… and too often, we smile straight up telling a lie, “I’m doing great”…. Desperately we even debate which lies to tell our doctor. What is worth sharing? Will he or she believe me? Is it worth the frustration? It is challenging, to be honest, and the individual that God created us to be. Isolation closes in on us; as we swim in the sea of invisible illness

Without a doubt, there is a time and a place for everything. God’s word echo’s this in Ecclesiastes 3:1, “There is a time for everything, and a season for every activity under the heavens.” At times taking on a role has its advantages, and at other times, it is downright damaging. There is also a time for raw honesty. “You weren’t designed to go through suffering alone. As times get tough — and they will — reach out and reach up. “You weren’t designed to go through suffering alone. As times get tough — and they will — reach out and reach up,” Rick Warren. Putting yourself out there is scary. Sharing your heart is healthy. By sharing with others, you become an inspiration and encouragement to others. Struggling does not make you weak, it makes you human.

Additionally, we ask who can we be honest with. Lately, I seem to keep hearing the same message, we were not meant to do life on our own. We were made for community, not isolation. But in all honesty, it easier to say than do. Falling into isolation becomes easy with an illness. Most times, it is not intentional. We flare up, battle fatigue, and lose many friends. Having someone we can confide in about the struggles of today is rare. There are people who hurt us, leave us, and betray our trust.

 

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I think it is hard, to be honest in this way because we don’t want to be negative or a burden to others. At the same time, it is important to do so. Not only is it healthy, but it allows others to support us and specifically pray with us then allows us the chance to offer the same to them. Being honest allows us to share with others how God is working in our lives right now.

Personally, I have two friends who I can be brutally gut level honest with, knowing in my heart that no matter what they will still love me and will pray with me. Their friendship is a beautiful treasure. I hope you have at least one person who you can be honest with about the struggles of today.

Lord,

You are the God who sees us and knows us completely. Teach us how to be honest about the struggles of today. Bless us with people who we can share our burdens with and support. Allow us to continually bring glory to Your Holy Name.

Amen

 

A big thank you to Victoria her blog is: Chronically Hopeful 2014  https://wordpress.com/read/feeds/25232744/posts/1937603516

 

Anointed By The Father (Guess Blogger)

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“You have been given an anointing, a special touch from the Holy One. You know the truth…Let the good news, the story you have heard from the beginning of your journey, live in and take hold of you. If that happens and you focus on the good news, then you will always remain in a relationship with the Son and the Father.” 1 John 2:20 & 24 The Voice Translation
There are many days that I feel damaged. Furthermore, I feel like I don’t measure up. I hear the lies on repeat like a broken record not good enough, unworthy, and unlovable. Life is chaos. I start my day well meaning and focusing on God, but somewhere along the way I get side tracked. Before I know it, I am consumed with anxiety and overwhelmed to the point of tears. In those moments God can feel so far away. How do you handle moments like these?

You were compassionately and thoughtfully created by your Holy Father. He anointed You for a calling unlike anyone else’s on the earth. He has confidence in you to complete the calling on your life with His help. He anointed You, sweet sister setting you apart as His daughter. Jesus traded heaven for earth to suffer an incomprehensible death so that you could be with Him for eternity.
He called You good the day He created You. In Him you are righteous, sanctified, and holy. You have received a special touch, a kiss from heaven, from the Holy One. He sees the beauty He placed in your heart. Beloved. The apple of God’s eye. Forgiven, He has made everything You know the truth, moreover, you know the good news. Allow it to continue to grow in your life. Let the roots be strengthened and be made new. This will be evident to all. Life in Christ isn’t easy, as you know, but it is worth it. He will equip you for the journey providing for you in each moment.
Guard your heart against the enemy and His lies. Be intentional in strengthening Your relationship with Christ. Never forget where your identity lies.
Abba, Daddy,
I feel inadequate to serve You. Unworthy and unequipped. I can see the lovely gifts You have graciously given others, but I struggle to see my own. You know I am damaged from living in a fallen world. I feel like my flaws are listed on my forehead at times. I desire to keep You first in everything I do yet I quickly lose focus.

I feel inadequate to serve You. Unworthy and unequipped. I can see the lovely gifts You have graciously given others, but I struggle to see my own. You know I am damaged from living in a fallen world. I feel like my flaws are listed on my forehead at times. I desire to keep You first in everything I do yet I quickly lose focus.
My heart’s desire is to serve You though I feel as though I have nothing good to give. I surrender my little gift knowing it is more than enough in Your mighty hands. Equip me to serve You in amazing ways. My confidence is purely in You. I know You are faithful. You are the source of all I need.
Help me to take time to pause. To breath in the chaos and simplicity of everyday moments. Enable me to give the people in my life the very best. Help me to invest in others. Allow me to bring them closer to You. Allow me to freely give as I have freely received from You. Help me to love when it is inconvenient for me. Mold my heart to reflect the beauty of Yours.

I cherish Your living and holy Word. It is more valuable than money or earthly pleasures. Sweeter than the finest cuisine. Help me walk in the way you commanded. I desire to be obedient. Please give me a deeper understanding of Your word. Let me desire Your Word more day by day.
All Honor, Glory, and Praise belong to You now and forevermore.
Amen.

 

Come Into The Light (Guess Blogger)

Good Morning Everyone I would like to take this opportunity to introduce to you Don Merritt:

Don Merritt (that’s me) is just a regular guy who has had a half-century of living life. I’ve had experiences that are quite normal and typical… and some that are less common. I’ve been busy for a long time in activities that range from politics to writing to running a business I am finished ghost-writing for others and writing things from a purely technical point of view; it’s my turn to write about the things that are really important in life: God, hope, faith, understanding and encouragement for others. It’s my hope to do so in a way that you will find interesting, unusual and non-threatening… and at the same time challenging.

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This is the message we have heard from him and declare to you: God is light; in him there is no darkness at all. If we claim to have fellowship with him and yet walk in the darkness, we lie and do not live out the truth. But if we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship with one another, and the blood of Jesus, his Son, purifies us from all sin.

1 John 1:5-7

Earlier we looked at the introduction to this letter, and here, we enter the first section of the letter which begins at verse 5 and continues through 2:14. This section is given context in verse 5: God is light; in him there is no darkness at all. Thus, this section is all about John’s declaration of light versus darkness, and it contains comparisons and contrasts.
Before we take a look at it, keep in mind what John wrote in John 1:4 “In him was life, and that life was the light of men.” All through the Gospel story, John used “light” as signifying the presence of Jesus, contrasted with “darkness” denoting His absence. Keeping this in mind, let’s take a look at our text. After proclaiming that God is light, John gets down to his explanation claiming that if we claim to be in fellowship with God, but walk in darkness, we lie, and are not in the truth. This is a rather easy statement to understand, for if we are in darkness, then we aren’t in His presence, and if we aren’t in His presence, we couldn’t possibly be in fellowship: There is no half-way.

The contrast is that if we walk in the light, as He is in the light, we have fellowship… because we are with Him in the light. If we have this fellowship in the light of His presence and truth, then His blood purifies us from all sin. The reality of the statement is that we can’t be in fellowship with Him until our sins have been forgiven by His sacrifice on the cross.
Sometimes, we may walk a ways in darkness, and by this I mean that we may stray from time-to-time. John doesn’t suggest that our errors kick us out of fellowship as we will see a little farther through this text, but that there is a way to return to the light of His presence, by confessing our sins., as we see in the next paragraph:

If we claim to be without sin, we deceive ourselves and the truth is not in us. If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just and will forgive us our sins and purify us from all unrighteousness. If we claim we have not sinned, we make him out to be a liar and his word is not in us.
1 John 1:8-10
I think we all would agree that a claim by any one of us to have never sinned would be little short of crazy. John seems to think it’s worse than that− all have sinned, but take heart, for there is a way out, confess your sins and He will forgive; this is our covenant promise. There is simply no need for us to wring our hands and carry around a burden of guilt and shame before God, for when we confess our sins (acknowledge them) He will forgive; we have His Word on that.

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